The 100-day-taboo imposed after the death of late Queen Mother Halaevalu Mata’aho was lifted tonight.

Kava club and band members of the Fōfōʻanga gathered at Māhinafekite royal residence this evening performing Tongan hiva kakala (songs) as part of the lifting ceremony.

There were noises and an air of joy at royal residences tonight as they marked 100 days since the matriarch’s death.

Known as fakamalele, the practice means people, especially the immediate family of the late Queen Mother, are allowed to enjoy whatever entertainment they wanted to the full.

As it was traditionally exercised after the death of monarchs, the 100-day-taboo meant everybody in Tonga had to follow certain restrictions until the days were over.

People had to wear black clothes, businesses were closed down, performing hiva kakala was prohibited and public entertainments were not allowed.

His Majesty King Tupou VI reformed the traditional taboo after His late brother King George V died in 2012.

He announced that the public was exempted from the 100-days-taboo and said it was restricted to the royal family, the nobility and their immediate families only.

The late Queen Mother died in Auckland on February 19 aged 90 after a short illness.

She had two sons who became kings, George Tupou V and Tupou VI.

She married late King Tupou IV and they had four children.

Born on 29 May 1926, she was the daughter of Heuifanga Veikune and Noble ‘Ahome’e Manuopangai.

The  main points

  • The 100-day-taboo imposed after the death of late Queen Mother Halaevalu Mata’aho was lifted tonight.
  • Kava club and band members of the Fofo’anga gathered at Mahina Fekite royal residence this evening performing Tongan hiva kakala (songs) as part of the lifting ceremony.
  • The late Queen Mother died in Auckland in February after a short illness.

For more information

Tauanga’a: Foreigners clothe their respect for Queen Mother in Tongan culture

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here